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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 5:20 pm 
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Um resumo sobre os vários anti-androgénicos usados em mulher,seus resultados e efeitos secundários:

Minoxidil for female
Minoxidil has a hair growth promoting effect on pattern baldness affected hair follicles

Minoxidil was originally introduced in the early 1970s as a treatment for hypertension. Minoxidil is in the class of treatments called "Potassium Channel Openers" that are used primarily for treating persons with high blood pressure. Although several potassium-channel openers have been used in research for many years, Minoxidil is the only approved

one in this category of drugs for use in humans.





Hypertrichosis or undesirable hair growth was seen as a side effect of the medication. This led to the development of a topical formulation of Minoxidil for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in men and subsequently in women. Now Minoxidil is available in two forms to treat different conditions. Oral Minoxidil is used to treat high blood pressure and the topical solution form is used to treat hair loss and baldness. 2% topical Minoxidil was first marketed for hair re-growth in men in 1986 in the United States and the 5% product became available in 1993.


Finasteride for female
Finasteride (Propecia) is used by some dermatologists in Europe to treat female pattern hair loss

Female pattern hair loss is a common condition characterized by a diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline in affected women. The prevalence of this type of hair loss increases with advancing age. Women who are affected often report feelings of embarrassment and social anxiety and the condition often worsens if left untreated.

The underlying principle behind the use of Finasteride in male pattern hair loss is the reduction of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) production; thus limiting the action of DHT on scalp hair follicles. In the female sex, the use of Finasteride and other 5 alpha - reductase inhibitors has shown utility in women with hirsutism. In theory, if all female pattern hair loss were an androgen-dependent process like male pattern baldness, then Finasteride should have comparable efficacy in women with patterned hair loss.

Although female pattern hair loss has been widely thought to be the female counterpart of male balding and is often referred to as female androgenetic alopecia, the role of androgens in baldness in women is not fully established. Similarly the efficacy of Finasteride in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in women has remained controversial.

Side effects and precautions
Finasteride is a teratogen, i.e. it can cause malformation of the fetus. In animal studies, male rats exposed to Finasteride in utero develop hypospadias (a developmental anomaly of the urethra) with cleft prepuce, decreased anogenital distance, reduced prostate weight and altered nipple formation.

Officially, women of potential childbearing age should not take Finasteride or even handle crushed or broken tablets. The risk of teratogenicity in humans has not been evaluated but Finasteride may cause hypospadias in the developing male fetus. Exposure to semen of men who are taking Finasteride does not pose a real risk to the pregnant woman’s male fetus. Finasteride tablets are coated to prevent contact with the active ingredients during manipulation.

In studies conducted with women premenopause, the finasteride was always provded to the women along with birth control pills. The use of birth control to ensure pregnancy did not occur while using finasteride was a must given the potential effects finasteride can have on male embryos.

Conclusion
As stated earlier, Finasteride has not been proven to be effective in postmenopausal women, and at the moment it is FDA approved only for use in men. It is neither approved nor currently intended for use in women who are or may become pregnant. Despite this, dermatologists in Europe are using finasteride to treat female androgenetic alopecia. In the absence of any good clinical trials it is difficult to say how effective it is for women with female pattern hair loss.

Antiandrogens for female
Topical anti androgens are used by some to treat their pattern hair loss

Hamilton observed that when men with male pattern baldness were castrated it prevented further progression of hair loss; and that the hair loss in eunuchs induced by exogenous testosterone halted when testosterone treatment was discontinued. This leads to the assumption that it would be feasible to use an antiandrogen to halt or even reverse pattern baldness in men (and equally in women too). However, antiandrogen therapy for androgen-induced baldness is still in its infancy and relatively limited information is available on how it can be used and the appropriate formulations for use.

Anti androgen drugs used in medicine may be systemic or topical. Because systemic anti-androgens reduce circulating testosterone, which is required for normal male sexual functioning, their use in androgenetic alopecia is currently limited to women. A topical antiandrogen is administered by applying the compound to the surface of the skin, and appears to hold promise for treatment in men as well as women.

Ketoconazole shampoo for female
Ketoconazole shampoo is a popular treatment in combination with other treatments for pattern baldness

Ketoconazole (Brand name Nizoral) is actually a synthetic antifungal drug used to prevent and treat skin and fungal infections, especially in immuno-compromised patients. This drug, an Imidazole (an organic crystalline base that is an inhibitor of histamine) derivative, is an effective oral agent that has broad-spectrum antifungal activity and is also a steroid biosynthesis inhibitor. The androgen lowering potential of high doses of Ketoconazole has led to its use in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

Formulated as a topical treatment, oral tablet and as a shampoo, the drug Ketoconazole is available by prescription. Branded Nizoral shampoo contains 2 percent Ketoconazole and is prescribed not only for the treatment of infectious fungal scalp conditions, but also in combination with other treatments for androgenetic alopecia. Ketoconazole can cause a reduction in the production of testosterone and other androgens in the skin. A 1 percent version is available over-the-counter, but it may not be as effective as the 2 percent prescription strength.

Tretinoin for female
Topical tretinoin is used by some to treat male and female pattern hair loss, sometimes in combination with minoxidil

Tretinoin essentially is a derivative of vitamin A. Topical Tretinoin is used by dermatologists in the treatment of mild to moderate acne and on skin that has been damaged by excessive exposure to the sun. Two treatment forms of retinoic acid have been developed - all-trans-retinoic acid and 9-cis retinoic acid.

As a retinoid that regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells, topical Tretinoin can be used to help enhance the effects on Minoxidil for the treatment of hair loss. Although Tretinoin alone does not act as a significant stimulant of hair growth, there is some evidence that a combination of Minoxidil (0.5%) and Tretinoin (0.025%) promotes hair growth in men with androgenetic alopecia. This is most likely due to the increased absorption of Minoxidil through alteration of the horny outer layer of the epidermis, the stratum cornum.

However, the manufactured formulations of Tretinoin (Retin-A®) and Minoxidil (Rogaine®) are incompatible and become ineffective if compounded in one formulation. They must either be mixed using generic powder forms or be applied as separate treatments. For efficacy, Rogaine® must be applied every morning and night and Retin-A® during the day. Even though there appears to be some benefit in using the combination, the need for an extra application during the day is generally considered to be rather inconvenient, discouraging wide acceptability. Additionally the skin irritation caused by Tretinoin is not always well tolerated.

Side effects
The potential side effects of topical Tretinoin are irritation and photosensitivity .As Tretinoin does not work alone, the potential side effects of Minoxidil should also be considered when administering treatment. Concerns about increased irritation, possible systemic absorption of drug, and difficulties related to the use of both agents together has led to the limited usage of this line of treatment.

Diazoxide for female
Diazoxide is a nondiuretic benzothiazide. This potent and rarely anti-hypertensive agent has diverse pharmacologic effects including:

Hypertrichosis (hair growth).
Hyperglycemia associated with suppression of insulin release, which is why it is used to treat idiopathic hypoglycemia of infancy.
Elevation of serum levels of androgens.

Taking advantage of the hypertrichotic side effects of diazoxide, several authors have examined the effect of topical application of the drug on hair re-growth in androgenetic alopecia. A topical formulation of diazoxide was reported in 1989 to show efficacy in male pattern baldness. Nineteen men with "early to midstage" androgenetic alopecia were treated with 3% diazoxide solution twice daily for 2 to 11 months. Reports indicate that four men had a dense growth of new hair, seven had moderate growth by way of some new terminal hairs, one had vellus hair growth, and seven had no re-growth at all. Local irritation occurred in one patient.

Estrogen for female
Topical estrogen is used by some to treat pattern hair loss

Estrogens are indirect anti androgens, increasing the production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and thus leading to a decrease in the bioactive free testosterone. SHBG, a glycoprotein synthesized by the liver, is the most important protein for androgen binding .The more potent androgens and estradiol are bound in the plasma to SHBG, although the binding affinities differ. Elevated testosterone causes SHBG synthesis to decrease, in addition to an increased activity of 5 alpha - Reductase, the enzyme responsible for the metabolism of testosterone to DHT. Estrogens increase Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and thus further decrease the amount of free testosterone.

Extensive clinical trials of the use of a topical estrogen preparation in subjects with androgenetic alopecia have been not been conducted as yet. However, one double-blind, controlled, 6-month trial of topical 0.025% 17 alpha - estradiol conducted with 51 men and women who had pattern alopecia showed a significant reduction in the percentage of telogen hairs along with stabilization of the hair loss. Although more than 70 percent of a topically applied preparation is metabolized to weak non-androgenic by-products, the absorption of topical estrogen can lead to decreased libido in men.

Topical estrogens are not generally available in North America, but they are being used in Europe and topical estrogen products are available from a number of pharmaceutical companies there. There seems to be some confusion over which estrogen formulation is best (as there are different types of estrogen) but it seems that estrogen application topically could help treat pattern baldness in both men and women.

Progesterone for female
Progesterone is a potential topical hormone for treating male pattern baldness

Topical progesterone has been utilized widely, but has not been thoroughly tested in clinical studies. One study undertaken to ascertain the efficacy of the compound used topical progesterone (concentration and vehicle unnamed) for 10 to 48 months in 12 men, in the age group 18 to 39 years, with male pattern baldness. None of the subjects grew hair: 6 of them developed further thinning, and the other 6 had the same hair density.

Overall, topical progesterone has not been found to be of great value in treating androgenetic alopecia, but it can have a limited positive effect for some people.

Oral contraceptive pills for female
Oral contraceptive pills can be used in the treatment of female pattern hair loss

Although testosterone is considered to be a male hormone, it also occurs naturally in women. The exact roles of androgen over-production, activity, and androgen receptors in androgenetic alopecia in women are still unclear. Approximately 30 percent of a woman’s testosterone is produced in the ovaries; the other 70 percent is derived from the transformation of adrenal androgen precursors such as dehydro epiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione, both of which decline inevitably with age.

Considering the involvement of androgen receptors and 5 alpha - reductase in androgenetic alopecia, blocking them would be a logical approach to treatment. Over the years, several agents that target these mechanisms have been used, with varying success rates in men and women.

Side effects of oral contraceptive pills
Some authors indicate that oral contraceptive pills are generally well tolerated, the main adverse effects being nonspecific. Some women complain of headache, breast tenderness and nausea, but these drugs have no clinically relevant effects on metabolic or liver functions or on bodyweight. Effects on mood and libido are rare. Whether or not oral contraceptive pills increase the risk for the development of breast cancer is still a controversial issue.

Some authors are of the opinion that combination oral contraceptive pills appear to have potential serious side effects. These include an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (occlusion of a blood vessel due to a fibrinous clot), stroke, and myocardial infarction (heart attack). The higher the dose of ethinyl estradiol, the higher is the risks of venous thromboembolism, ischemic stroke, and myocardial infarction. The risks of stroke and myocardial infarction are also more likely in individuals with hypertension, diabetes, and migraine headaches and in individuals who smoke cigarettes.

Conclusion
Combined oral contraceptives containing antiandrogenic progestogens are likely to be particularly useful in treating women who have pre-existing androgen-related disorders and require contraception. However, similar to other agents, progress of hair growth in androgenetic alopecia takes a long time with oral contraceptive pills. This lower responsiveness may reflect the natural length of the hair growth cycle, and the fact that androgenetic alopecia has multifactorial etiologies involving genetic, metabolic, environmental and nutritional factors as well as androgen production.

Systemic spironolactone for female
Some women use systemic spironolactone to treat female pattern baldness

Spironolactone therapy may reduce shedding of hair in those individuals without hyperandrogenism and may promote some hair growth in those with hyperandrogenism (an excessive production of male hormones). In some women with hirsutism the drug decreases the growth rate and mean diameter of facial hair.

Side effects of spironolactone
One of the potential side effects of spironolactone in both men and women is acute intoxication of potassium, a condition called hyperkalemia. Decreased libido, impotence, and worse still, gynecomastia (excessive development of the male breasts) can occur in men treated with spironolactone, thus confining the systemic use to women. In women, breast tenderness, irregular menses, and mood swings are not uncommon side effects. Women of childbearing age who are treated with spironolactone should use effective contraception, preferably a concomitant oral contraceptive pill. If pregnancy occurs while they are on spironolactone, there is a possible risk of feminization of the male fetus.

Conclusion
No dermatologic indications for spironolactone have been approved by the FDA. It is only approved as a diuretic, for the treatment of primary hyperaldosteronism, idiopathic hyperaldosteronism, edematous conditions of congestive heart failure, cirrhosis with ascites, nephrotic syndrome, essential hypertension, or hypokalemia. Spironolactone is perceived to be somewhat effective in preventing hair loss in androgenetic alopecia in women at doses of 200 mg per day, but hair re-growth is limited. Laboratory monitoring every 3 to 4 months is recommended to assist in following androgen suppression if a condition of androgen excess is found.

Systemic flutamide for female
Systemic flutamide is an antiandrogen treatment for female pattern baldness

Flutamide is a non-steroidal antiandrogen that is devoid of other hormonal activity. It most likely acts after converting to 2-hydroxyflutamide, which is a potent competitive inhibitor of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binding to the androgen receptor. Flutamide is currently approved for the treatment of prostate cancer in combination with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH), wherein Flutamide is thought to inhibit the action of testosterone on cancer cells by blocking the receptor sites that testosterone uses in the cells.

Side Effects of flutamide
Side effects of oral Flutamide are primarily gastrointestinal, mainly diarrhea. A high incidence of dry skin (58 percent) has also been reported. An important side effect to be cautious about in oral administration is hepatotoxicity, including progressive liver failure, which limits the usefulness of the drug in androgenetic alopecia. Evidence of hepatic injury includes elevated serum transaminase (liver enzyme) levels, jaundice, hepatic encephalopathy, and death related to acute hepatic failure. Serum transaminase levels should be measured prior to starting treatment with Flutamide. Liver function tests also should be obtained at the first signs and symptoms suggestive of liver dysfunction, like nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue, anorexia, "flu-like" symptoms or jaundice.

Flutamide should not be given to pregnant women or women desiring to become pregnant. If the drug crosses the placenta, it would be expected to produce male pseudohermaphroditism, similar to cyproterone acetate. Therefore Flutamide should be combined with an oral contraceptive pill in women of child-bearing potential to avoid the risk of pregnancy.

Systemic cyproterone acetate for female
Systemic cyproterone acetate is a popular treatment for female pattern baldness in Europe

Cyproterone acetate belongs to the class of hormone inhibitors and has been prescribed to treat severe hirsutism in woman of childbearing age and also androgenetic alopecia in women. Every woman normally produces a certain amount of androgen, which is necessary for axillary and pubic hair formation and maintenance.

Cyproterone acetate is an anti-androgen and blocks the normal activity of androgen by suppressing the actions of testosterone (and its metabolite dihydrotestosterone) on tissues. The term antiandrogen, as defined by Dorfman, implies prevention of expression of androgen activity at target sites and does not include other mechanisms of decreasing androgen action, such as a decrease in production of androgens, interference with androgen metabolism, or change in androgen plasma protein binding. However, Cyproterone acetate exerts its effects by blocking the binding of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to its receptors.

Cyproterone acetate is available in Europe, Asia and Canada, but not in the US. Oral cyproterone acetate is poorly absorbed (5 to 30 percent), with maximum plasma levels achieved in a few hours. 58 percent of the drug is excreted via bile and 30 percent via urine.

Side effects of cyclical antiandrogen therapy
Cyproterone acetate is potentially damaging to the liver (hepatotoxic) and liver function tests should be performed periodically. Women of childbearing potential must never get pregnant while taking Cyproterone. Fetal malformations (damage) can occur in patients on cyproterone; therefore the drug must be prescribed in conjunction with the contraceptive pill. Potential side effects of CAT are somewhat similar to those seen with intake of oral contraceptive pills and include:

Nausea
Headache
Asthenia (lack of bodily strength
Increased weight
Decreased libido
Breast discomfort and depression have been reported in more than 5 percent of cases treated with CAT


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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 5:23 pm 
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Alguém já ouviu falar nesse tal de DIAXOZIDE,um medicamento para hipertensão,aplicado topicamente??


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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 6:01 pm 
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Duban, centenas de dermatologistas prescrevem o ácido retinóico junto com a loção de minoxidil.

Mas esse artigo diz que não é certo fazer isso.

Afinal podemnos ou não maipular o ácido retinóico junto com a loção de minoxidil?

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Fina oral diária. Duta oral 1x semana. Gel tópico de duta lipossomado .
Minoxidil com ativos
Cetoconazol shampoo dia sim dia não.

http://pics.livejournal.com/sweetphaex/pic/0021hssr


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Qual o propósito de pesquisar outros antiandrogênicos? Já sabemos que a flutamida é um dos mais potentes. Se usando ela não der resultado, não será um outro que irá dar.

Resultados melhores só com cirurgia ou Follica (se os testes derem certo).

Niki: O que está usando atualmente?

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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 6:15 pm 
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Sabemos que o seguro pro homem em loção é 1% a 1,5%, e que mulheres, por dependerem muito menso da testosterona que o homem, podriam usar loções como por exemplo com 5% de flutamida. Me corrigam vcs se erreu nas porcentagens.

Mas qual o limete dela em loção para mulheres???
Se a mulher muitas vezes pode usa-la oral sem grande sproblemas, se tiver tudoi bem com o fígado, qual seria o limite de porcentagem tópica dela?

Freddy escreveu:
Qual o propósito de pesquisar outros antiandrogênicos? Já sabemos que a flutamida é um dos mais potentes. Se usando ela não der resultado, não será um outro que irá dar.

Resultados melhores só com cirurgia ou Follica (se os testes derem certo).

Niki: O que está usando atualmente?

_________________
Fina oral diária. Duta oral 1x semana. Gel tópico de duta lipossomado .
Minoxidil com ativos
Cetoconazol shampoo dia sim dia não.

http://pics.livejournal.com/sweetphaex/pic/0021hssr


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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 6:31 pm 
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Meu caro,a flutamida apesar de ser um dos mais potentes é tb um dos que tem mais efeitos secundários.Por isso me interessa conhecer alternativas.Entendeu??Capice??
Se a vc não interessa tudo bem,a mim interessa bastante :wink:


Freddy escreveu:
Qual o propósito de pesquisar outros antiandrogênicos? Já sabemos que a flutamida é um dos mais potentes. Se usando ela não der resultado, não será um outro que irá dar.

Resultados melhores só com cirurgia ou Follica (se os testes derem certo).

Niki: O que está usando atualmente?


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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 6:33 pm 
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E mais:o que não tem resultados em vc pode ter em mim ;)


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Niki escreveu:
Meu caro,a flutamida apesar de ser um dos mais potentes é tb um dos que tem mais efeitos secundários.Por isso me interessa conhecer alternativas.Entendeu??Capice??
Se a vc não interessa tudo bem,a mim interessa bastante :wink:


Freddy escreveu:
Qual o propósito de pesquisar outros antiandrogênicos? Já sabemos que a flutamida é um dos mais potentes. Se usando ela não der resultado, não será um outro que irá dar.

Resultados melhores só com cirurgia ou Follica (se os testes derem certo).

Niki: O que está usando atualmente?


Efeitos secundários são originados da própria inibição do DHT ou testosterona. Não tem pra onde correr. Se usar de forma oral sempre vai ter efeitos secundários. Se esses efeitos forem toleráveis é o que eles chamam de "medicamento seguro".

No caso da flutamida realmente não é segura oralmente, até porque da problemas de fígado.
Mas topicamente é muito viável.

Aquele tal de RU(algum numero) é um antiandrogeno fortissimo. Mas sabe porque não ficou famoso comercialmente (exceto para quem compra clandestinamente na China)? Porque os colaterais são fortissimos. Quanto mais DHT inibir maiores os colaterais, não tem jeito.

Vai variar de pessoa pra pessoa tolerar eles.


Você já deveria estar usando fina oral, fluta tópica, etc que são o que conhecemos com melhor taxa beneficios/colaterais.

Uma solução viável e sem colaterais não vai aparecer tão cedo. (talvez celúlas tronco).

Até mesmo a cirurgia tem colaterais (a cicatriz que ganhamos atrás).

Infelizmente tudo tem um preço.

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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 7:00 pm 
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Isso é se se acreditar que travar o processo de calvície tem apenas a ver com bloquear o DHT...Eu acho que muitas coisas estão implicadas,algumas desconhecidas ainda.Por isso acredito que um medicamento funciona diferente em vc e em mim.Tem de se descobrir o que funciona melhor em cada um de nós.É assim que eu penso ;)


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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 7:02 pm 
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Quanto ao que eu deveria usar,quem sabe disso é o Dr.Peruzzo.Ele está a par do meu caso,e já falou comigo,aliás sempre esteve desde que entrei no fórum.


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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 7:03 pm 

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Então ta bom. Está usando o que ele indicou?

Mas isso é verdade sim. Um produto funciona às vezes com uma pessoa mas não com outra.

Também não acredito que AAG seja só DHT. Se fosse a duta seria a cura.

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Com certeza!!
E falando do que interessa ,afinal conhece essa substância ou não??Era isso que eu tinha perguntado :) ?


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Uma coisa que me intrigou nesse Diazoxide foi o seguinte:

Citação:
Hypertrichosis (hair growth).
Hyperglycemia associated with suppression of insulin release, which is why it is used to treat idiopathic hypoglycemia of infancy.
Elevation of serum levels of androgens.


Como ele pode causar hipertricose e ao mesmo tempo aumentar o nivel de hormônios andrógenos? Só se ele estiver falando de pêlos do corpo. Porque o aumento de cabelo na cabeça quase sempre é uma reação inversa ao aumento de andrógenos.

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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 7:09 pm 

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Vou pesquisar sobre esse Diazoxide e ver se acho algo...

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Diazoxide is a nondiuretic benzothiazide. This potent and rarely anti-hypertensive agent has diverse pharmacologic effects including:

Hypertrichosis (hair growth).
Hyperglycemia associated with suppression of insulin release, which is why it is used to treat idiopathic hypoglycemia of infancy.
Elevation of serum levels of androgens.

Taking advantage of the hypertrichotic side effects of diazoxide, several authors have examined the effect of topical application of the drug on hair re-growth in androgenetic alopecia. A topical formulation of diazoxide was reported in 1989 to show efficacy in male pattern baldness. Nineteen men with "early to midstage" androgenetic alopecia were treated with 3% diazoxide solution twice daily for 2 to 11 months. Reports indicate that four men had a dense growth of new hair, seven had moderate growth by way of some new terminal hairs, one had vellus hair growth, and seven had no re-growth at all. Local irritation occurred in one patient.

The potential mechanism of action of diazoxide in hair growth may be through inhibition of phosphodiesterase. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphodiester bonds. PDEs are responsible for the degradation of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP. They are therefore important regulators of signal transduction mediated by these molecules. In all probability, dihydrotestosterone hinders energy production by keeping phosphodiesterase relatively inactive and by suppressing various protein (enzyme) synthetases. A relatively high concentration of cAMP may cause premature termination of the growing stages of hair follicles. Repetition of such processes over several years presumably transforms terminal follicles to vellus – type follicles and ultimately causes baldness. However, this theory on the metamorphosis of terminal hair to vellus hair is not proven as yet.

Research studies provide correlative evidence that the opening of potassium channels is an important regulatory mechanism for hair growth. Diazoxide has also been shown, like Minoxidil, to be a potassium channel opener. Therefore oral diazoxide can induce hypertrichosis in a distribution similar to that caused by oral minoxidil but with far less frequency.


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Hair Loss Study Abstract: The effects of topical diazoxide on hair follicular growth and physiology of the stumptailed macaque.

Title:The effects of topical diazoxide on hair follicular growth and physiology of the stumptailed macaque.
Author:Uno H, Kemnitz JW, Cappas A, Adachi K, Sakuma A, Kamoda H
Address:Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison 53715-1299.
Source:J Dermatol Sci, 1: 3, 1990 May, 183-94

Abstract

Diazoxide, an anti-hypertensive agent, has diverse pharmacologic effects; hypertrichosis, hyperglycemia associated with suppression of insulin release, and elevation of serum levels of androgens. Taking advantage of the hypertrichotic side effects of diazoxide, we examined the effect of topical application of the drug on hair regrowth in the bald frontal scalp of stumptailed macaques (Macaca arctoides); we also monitored systemic side effects.

Using 7 adult stumptails, we applied diazoxide (5% solution in a vehicle) topically on the bald frontal scalp, once a day, 5 days per week. Two of seven macaques had vehicle alone applied. Hair growth was monitored by photographic recording (once every month) and by sequential analysis of folliculograms from biopsied skin (once every 4 months). We also examined body weight, hematology, blood pressure, heart rate, serum levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone, and glucose tolerance for a 4-month period.

RESULTS:
All 5 diazoxide-treated animals showed thickening and maintenance of the frontal hair during the entire treatment period (16 months).
Analysis of folliculograms showed progressive enlargement of hair follicular size and acceleration of its cyclic growth from telogen to anagen phase and prolongation of anagen phase in all treated animals. Controls showed no consistent progressive changes of follicular growth. None of the animals treated with diazoxide showed abnormal changes in physical growth, cardiovascular function, serum levels of androgens, glucose tolerance (including insulin levels), or hematology.

Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
91197922


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"Diazoxide is the generic name for the drug in several products such as Hyperstat (Schering) which is normally used for injection, Proglycem capsules (Baker Norton), and Proglycem suspension (Baker Norton) both used for systemic application by mouth. It is a prescription drug used to treat people with hypoglycemia, especially those people who have a malignancy in their pancreas, and it works by blocking the release of insulin from the pancreas. It is a non diuretic benzothiadiazine derivative (whatever that means) and a potassium channel opener.

In trials of diazoxide for hypoglycemia it was noted that diazoxide sometimes had a hair growth promoting side effect. Based on this accidental discovery hair growth research was conducted at Wayne State University, Ann Arbor to examine the potential of this drug for androgenetic alopecia. The researchers have indicated that topically applied drug solutions stimulated hair growth in preliminary studies. One published study involved 19 men with androgenetic alopecia using a topical application of 3% Diazoxide twice per day. 63% of users had some form of hair growth of these 4 individuals had extensive hair regrowth according to the investigators. In vitro studies also suggest that diazoxide can have a direct cell proliferation promoting effect."


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Alcyone do HairLossHelp.com escreveu:
Diazoxide is another vasodilator (like minoxidil) and grows hair in the same way. However, it's much more expensive. It seems as though it would be cost prohibitive to make a topical out of it when there are much cheaper drugs that do the same thing.

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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 7:22 pm 

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Niki, sinto te desapontar, mas o Diazoxide é só mais um produto similar ao minox, com colaterais diferentes, talvez nem tão comprovado para AAG e caro para comprar.

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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 7:23 pm 
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Humm,interessante,ele age como o minoxidil ,abre os canais de potássio...Gostava de o experimentar topicamente.


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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 7:27 pm 

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Niki escreveu:
Humm,interessante,ele age como o minoxidil ,abre os canais de potássio...Gostava de o experimentar topicamente.


Porque não usa o logo o minox que é comprovado? :lol:

Você adora usar Amana, Diazoxide, etc, mas fina, minox, fluta que são mais comprados até agora nada. :x :shock: :lol:

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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 7:30 pm 
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Já uso há muito.Apenas perguntei se alguém conhecia este produto,porquê não posso??
E eu não adoro usar o Amana,nunca usei sequer.Não sei de onde tirou essa...


Editado pela última vez por Niki em Dom Set 07, 2008 7:31 pm, em um total de 1 vez.

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MensagemEnviado: Dom Set 07, 2008 7:30 pm 

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http://www.regrowth.com/hairloss-remedy ... zoxide.cfm

"Diazoxide is one of several hypertensive (blood pressure lowering) agents that has a positive effect on hair loss (probably by opening Potassim channels). Unfortunately, it's expensive and difficult to get in topical form. Other treatments are probably more effective as well."

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MensagemEnviado: Seg Set 08, 2008 10:10 am 
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A Fernanda de Paula, a Fernandinha forista, teve sucesso usando minoxidil 5% junto com flutamida 5% em loção.

Mulheres podem usar flutamnida bem mais forte que os homens, em se tratando de loção, pois nas mulheres a ligeira absorção sistêmica da flutamida não traria problemas, pois eleas não dependem da testosterona como os homens.

Para mulheres sem tempo de passar muita coisa, e com a grana baixa, recomendo usar essa loção.

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Fina oral diária. Duta oral 1x semana. Gel tópico de duta lipossomado .
Minoxidil com ativos
Cetoconazol shampoo dia sim dia não.

http://pics.livejournal.com/sweetphaex/pic/0021hssr


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MensagemEnviado: Seg Set 08, 2008 2:36 pm 
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É, mas isso é a loção do Dr.Peruzzo,com um gel que evita a absorção sistémica...Não me fio nos outros não.

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MensagemEnviado: Ter Set 09, 2008 6:04 am 
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Niki escreveu:
É, mas isso é a loção do Dr.Peruzzo,com um gel que evita a absorção sistémica...Não me fio nos outros não.



Existe o gel da sinere....

Experimente :p só que não é tao estético nao....

Ha! arrisque mandar vir do brasil :wink:


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MensagemEnviado: Ter Set 09, 2008 4:09 pm 
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Não!!O Dr. não me recomendou fazer isso não...Dps se não vem não posso manter o tratamento.
E quanto ao da sinere aposto que tem absorção sistémica...

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MensagemEnviado: Ter Set 09, 2008 5:15 pm 

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o da sinere é o flutagel niki, ele é a 1% de flutamida e só( não tem fina,rss)

vc não terá problemas de absorção sistêmica com ele

agora tbm não sei se funcionará.

coloquei um tópico dele em tratamentos ...hoje.


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